Tuesday, 24 February 2015

Wells Cathedral

When you step inside Wells Cathedral for the first time, it is easy to see why architectural historian Alec Clifton-Taylor once described it as "the most poetic of all English cathedrals." You can wander as if lost under the rows of proud arches and find yourself staring at the intricate details of centuries-old stained glass windows, open mouthed, for minutes at a time.

Built between 1175 and 1490, the Medieval colossus houses the second-oldest clock face in the world along with the splendid 14th-century stained glass Jesse Window, mason William Joy's steadfast 'Scissor' Arches and heavy marble tombs, still holding their strong colours, built for a number of figures important to the church. 

For me, the stunning facade of the cathedral beats that of Bath Abbey and York Minster – it even comes close to the Notre Dame in Paris. Next to the cathedral is the visually arresting Vicar's Close, which was founded in 1348 for the 42 vicars of the Vicars Choral to live communally. When we visited, a slate sky made for a dramatic backdrop to the row of neat buildings. 

Elsewhere in Wells, fun can be had visiting the various independent caf├ęs and pubs, and popping into 'Ye Olde Sweet Shoppe' to choose your favourite guilty pleasure from the rows of sweetie jars. There is no train station, but the bus ride is more than worth it for the breathtaking views of rural Somerset.

© Rosie Pentreath

© Rosie Pentreath

© Rosie Pentreath


© Rosie Pentreath


The cathedral cat warms herself by an iron radiator © Rosie Pentreath
© Rosie Pentreath
© Rosie Pentreath

© Rosie Pentreath

© Rosie Pentreath
Wells Cathedral © Rosie Pentreath

© Rosie Pentreath


© Rosie Pentreath

Vicar's Close, Wells © Rosie Pentreath


Visit: www.wellscathedral.org.uk



If you like this, why not try:

Porth-an-Alls, Prussia Cove
A photowalk through Paris



Rosie Pentreath



No comments:

Post a Comment